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Diana C. Roman

Diana Roman

Diana C. Roman joined DTM in June 2011.  A former Assistant Professor in the Department of Geology at the University of South Florida, she is one of the top young workers in the application of seismology to problems in volcanology.

Map of Modeled Orientations

Map of modeled Φ orientations resulting from 2 m inflation of a 20°‐oriented, 2 km long dike centered beneath the Soufrière Hills vent. Rose diagrams of observed Φ are also shown centered on the location of each seismic station.

Diana C. Roman is interested in the mechanics of magma movement through the Earth's crust, and in the structure, evolution, and dynamics of volcanic conduit systems.  Most of her research focuses on understanding changes in seismicity and stress in response to the migration of magma through volcanic conduits, and on developing techniques and strategies for monitoring active or restless volcanoes through the analysis of volcanic seismicity.

Additional research interests include source processes of background seismicity at quiescent volcanoes, non-volcanic microearthquake swarms, and the nature of volcanic intrusions ('failed' eruptions).  As an offshoot of earlier research on volcanic glass compositions, Roman also works on the Dikika Research Project in Ethiopia and was involved in establishing the geological context and age of the 3.3 Ma juvenile A. Afarensis fossil, "Selam" (DIK-1/1).

After obtaining an undergraduate degree in applied economics from Cornell and spending two years in the financial industry, Roman turned to volcanology and enrolled in the M.S. and Ph.D. programs at the University of Oregon, under the mentorship of Kathy Cashman.  After graduation, Roman spent two years (2004-2006) on a NERC postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Leeds, in the volcanology group of Jurgen Neuberg, before joining USF four years ago.

Roman's work combines field experiments at active volcanoes with novel analysis methods to study the processes of magmatic transport beneath volcanic centers and the changes in those systems before, during, and after volcanic eruptions.  She applies a variety of tools in her studies, including the characterization of volcanotectonic earthquakes and their temporal changes, shear-wave splitting, and several geodetic methods for determining the surface strain field and its rate of change.  Roman was the recipient of the 2008 George Walker Award (given once every 2 years to recognize outstanding achievement in volcanology by a scientist under the age of 35) of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • Roman DC, Savage MK, Arnold R, Latchman JL, De Angelis S (2011). Analysis and forward modeling of seismic anisotropy during the ongoing eruption of the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat (1996-2007). Journal of Geophysical Research 116: B03201

  • Roman DC, Neuberg J, Luckett RR (2006) Assessing the likelihood of eruption through analysis of VT earthquake fault-plane solutions. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 248: 229-237

  • Roman DC, Neuberg J, Luckett RR (2006) Assessing the likelihood of eruption through analysis of VT earthquake fault-plane solutions. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 248: 229-237

  • Roman DC, Cashman KV (2006) The origin of volcanotectonic earthquake swarms. Geology 34: 457-460

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